European Inspectors Cracking Down on Cruisers

Noonsite is reporting an increase in inspections on cruisers in Europe and a crackdown on having all proper safety equipment and paperwork onboard. If you’ll be cruising in Europe anytime soon, be sure to read on.

One year ago, Europe revised its marine inspection regime for visiting vessels to include, for the first time, yachts. While it is likely that superyachts would make more of a target for an inspector, normal cruising yachts can also be inspected.

Yachts, no matter what size, have traditionally enjoyed a “low profile” with Port State Control authorities around the world and have generally been considered a low priority for inspection. However, under THETIS, any vessel which does not have an inspection history in the Paris MOU region (Europe) is automatically assigned as “Priority 1: (Unknown Ship)” requiring a more detailed inspection at the earliest opportunity. The assignment of “Priority 1: (Unknown Ship)” will be assigned to every vessel entering the Paris MOU region without an inspection history regardless of the ship type, flag, classification society or management company.

Here, Jake DesVergers, chief surveyor for the International Yacht Bureau (IYB), reports for “The Triton” on what the first year has taught.

It has been a full year since the European Union revised its rules for the inspection of vessels calling into its ports. The New Inspection Regime (NIR) for port state control and the associated THEMIS database are in full swing.

For the first time, we saw yachts, both private and commercial, included in the inspection process. Understandably, the majority of yachts were examined during the summer and fall seasons, but be prepared for a busy winter season, too.

Upon review of the inspection reports, we are able to determine specific areas that port state control inspectors focused upon.

Safety Equipment:

Inspectors concentrated their efforts on a number of lifesaving, firefighting, and general safety items. The majority of deficiencies addressed the expiration of equipment such as flares, line throwing appliances, and life jacket lights.

Charts, Publications, Voyage Plans:

It is surprising to see this topic so high on the list, but upon further investigation it becomes apparent as to why so many yachts fell short. As we know, the majority of yachts use electronic charts as the primary means of navigation.

For the complete story, go to www.noonsite.com.

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